In Pictures: Memphis to New Orleans and up the Natchez Trace

DSCF0993

Driving to the John Whitmer history conference in Independence, Mo. last September, I made Doc drive past “the world’s largest ketchup bottle” in Collinsville, Ill.  Okay, it wasn’t really that far out of our way.  Our hotel for the night was just down the road…

The next morning we made a stop at Cahokia Mounds State Historic Site, a UNESCO world heritage site. The city of Cahokia was inhabited from about A.D. 700 to 1400. At its peak, the city covered nearly six square miles and 10,000 to 20,000 people lived here.

DSCF0994

On to Independence…

DSCF0990

…where someone made a joke about the architecture of the temple being appropriate for a prophet who tried to “screw his way to heaven.”

 

DSCF0988

While Doc attended sessions I went sightseeing on my own.  I visited the Truman House.

DSCF0963

DSCF0962

And the historic city jail where the James brothers were held.

DSCF0968

 

DSCF0969

After the conference our first stop was an evening of music and barbecue in Memphis.

DSCF1033DSCF1035

The next day we had lunch at the Main Street Market in Vicksburg–one of the best restaurants in town and certainly the most charming being located in an old historic home.  We had red beans and rice and bread pudding before visiting  the Vicksburg National Battlefield…

DSCF1040

 

DSCF1060

There are many anti-bellum plantations along the Mississippi.  We visited Melrose, the only one operated by the National Parks Service.  The Parks Service always gives the best tours. This one was an hour long–the longest and most history oriented of all the tours offered at anti-bellum homes along the river.  Our guide was great fun! From Michigan, he wasn’t yet used to the heat and humidity of Mississippi.

DSCF1070

 

DSCF1063

 

 

DSCF1073

Next…New Orleans.

We had a lovely lunch at Oak Alley Plantation.

Oak-Alley-Plantation

After lunch, we drove to the Barataria Preserve run by the National Parks Service.  A wooden boardwalk takes you out into the swamp.  We had the place all to ourselves for most of our visit and saw many alligators that swam right up to us, perhaps seeking their next meal?

DSCF1123

 

DSCF1120

Arriving in the French Quarter, we checked in at the Place d’Armes — a beautiful boutique hotel with pretty hidden courtyards.

25858_38_z

 

25858_15_y

25858_8_b

The next day, we had a marvelous jazz buffet brunch at the Court of Two Sisters.

oct-5-6-court-of-two-sisters-jazz-brunch-buffet

One of the best meals of my life!  The buffet was huge.

Buffet-selection-The-Court-of-Two-Sisters-Double-Barrelled-Travel

With Mimosas…Mmmm.

mimosas

Hiding at the next table…we didn’t give him away.

DSCF1165

Street musicians played on many corners.  We passed several on our walk around the French Quarter.

 

DSCF1166

We took a jazz dinner cruise on a paddlewheel steamboat.

tour_img-106872-48

The dixieland band was great.

DSCF1172

And so was the sightseeing…

 

 

DSCF1201

 

DSCF1177

We also took a “Katrina Tour.”

 

DSCF1142

And visited a famous cemetery.

DSCF1154

Leaving New Orleans, we drove the entire length of the Natchez Trace stopping at the most intesting points along the way.

DSCF1075

 

DSCF1212

Walking through the woods, we came upon… tombstones?  It was our first indication that there had once been a town nearby.

DSCF1080

Also standing in the woods…a safe.

DSCF1085

We found a church, built when this was still a town.

We explored the cemetery behind it just because we are both sort of cemetery buffs.

DSCF1093

Did he commit suicide or was he murdered?  We read the intriguing story of Meriweather Lewis’ last days in “The Haunted Natchez Trace.”  Not exactly a scholarly work, but fun nonetheless to read along the road, stop by stop.

DSCF1234

Our final vacation stop was the battlefield of Shiloh.

DSCF1230

 

 

DSCF1224

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s